"Covers Dixie Like the Dew"

A History of Newspaper Journalism in Georgia

Newspapers in "New South" Georgia

The site contains images of the 61 albumen prints found in early American photographer and member of the Matthew Brady studio, George N. Barnard's 1866 Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign. Subjects of the photographs include Sherman and his generals, Nashville, Chattanooga Valley, Atlanta, and Savannah. Barnard was the official photographer for the United States Army, Chief Engineer's Office, Division of the Mississippi.
The site contains images of the 61 albumen prints found in early American photographer and member of the Matthew Brady studio, George N. Barnard's 1866 Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign. Subjects of the photographs include Sherman and his generals, Nashville, Chattanooga Valley, Atlanta, and Savannah. Barnard was the official photographer for the United States Army, Chief Engineer's Office, Division of the Mississippi.
The site contains images of the 61 albumen prints found in early American photographer and member of the Matthew Brady studio, George N. Barnard's 1866 Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign. Subjects of the photographs include Sherman and his generals, Nashville, Chattanooga Valley, Atlanta, and Savannah. Barnard was the official photographer for the United States Army, Chief Engineer's Office, Division of the Mississippi.

The Civil War brought significant disruption to Georgia's newspaper business, but publishers soon repaired their presses and rebuilt their industry. In this economically strained environment, editor Henry Grady gave national voice to the New South movement to bring northern investment to the South. The end of the war also brought temporary freedoms for the formerly enslaved. This new autonomy led to an inaugural wave of African American newspaper titles in Georgia. Reconstruction also saw the proliferation of small-town newspapers, which focused on societal news to fill their expanding pages.