Race and Reckoning in Forsyth County

1912-2020

Sundown sign

Creator:
Date:
1900/1968
URL at Partner site:
DLG URL:
https://dlg.usg.edu/record/tbmn_sftm_tm07292011-398
Subject:
Spatial coverage:
United States, 39.76, -98.5
Medium:
information signs, wood, and paint
Description:
Sign.||Signs like this were once a part of America's roadside culture. Found all over the United States, most were posted in the first part of the twentieth century, before the social changes brought on by the civil rights movement. These signs marked the boundaries, and proclaimed the intentions, of "sundown towns." A sundown town was one where African Americans were not permitted to live, and/or were not permitted to be within city limits after dark. Towns like this flourished mostly in the period between 1890 and the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968.||Purchase of the Tubman African American Museum.
Attribution:
Courtesy of Tubman African-American Museum.
Holding Institution:
Tubman African-American Museum
Collection:
Rights:
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NKC/1.0/
Restriction: